The Weaver Birds are Simply Weaving Genius!

Weavers are the birds under a family called Ploceidae.

Weaving seems to be a complicated process for some people, and a good skills perhaps is needed to accomplish on woven project, but for this family of birds, weaving is so simple.

Weavers are the birds under a family called Ploceidae, which has over 100 species. These birds get their name because of they have most elaborate woven nest, which vary in shape, size, materials, and construction techniques, among any birds.

One of the common species in Asia is the baya weaver. In India, they believe that the baya sticks fireflies with mud to the walls of the nest to light up the inside part of the nest at night.

Street performers in India also trained weavers for entertainment like to fire toy cannons, string beads, pick up coins and other objects in earlier times.

southern_masked_weaver
Southern Masked Weaver | Photo by Chris Eason viad Wikipedia.
A weaver nest in Malaysia | Photo by Tu7uh via Wikipedia
A weaver nest in Malaysia | Photo by Tu7uh via Wikipedia
Village Weaver | Photo by Doug Janson via Wikipedia
Village Weaver | Photo by Doug Janson via Wikipedia

The Sociable Weaver

But did you know that the sociable weaver that is common in South Africa,  South Africa, Namibia, and Botswana can build more complicated nest which looks like a roof a hut?

Sociable weavers’ nests can be considered as the most spectacular structure built by any bird, and the nests are large enough to accommodate more than hundred pairs of birds.

If undisturbed, the large nesting colonies can contain several generations at a time, and be active across many generations for over a hundred years.

Nests of Social Weaver | Photo by Rui Ornelas via Wikipedia
Nests of Social Weaver | Photo by Rui Ornelas via Wikipedia

 

Photo Chris Marais via www.southafrica.net
Nest of sociable weaver | Photo Chris Marais via www.southafrica.net

Photo by Sara&Joachim [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Nest of sociable weaver | Photo by Sara&Joachim [CC-BY-SA-2.0], via Wikimedia Commons
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